Browsing News Entries

A Bride and Groom; The Bride and The Groom

Two weeks ago, I had the great good pleasure of presiding at the wedding of my niece, Bryna and her now husband, Nelson. While we rejoice in their love for each other, the fact that they have now become living symbols of Christ the Bridegroom’s ecstatic love for his Bride, the Church is reason, in the very deepest sense, to give thanks.

Pope Francis Speaks to Priests

The theme that I have chosen for a retreat I'm hosting in Dublin is “Pope Francis Speaks to Priests.” I have culled a number of motifs from the Pope’s numerous talks, sermons, and lectures to priests, seminarians, and bishops. Allow me, in the course of this brief article to say just a few words about each one.

Looking at Luther with Fresh Eyes

With great profit and pleasure I’m currently reading Alec Ryrie’s new book “Protestants: The Faith that Made the Modern World”. Ryrie’s characterization of Martin Luther offers fresh insights on how the great “Solas” of the Reformation can be both celebrated and legitimately criticized.

Kathy Griffin and the Vanishing of Argument

I would like to situate what Kathy Griffin did in a wider context, for it is but a particularly brutal example of what is taking place throughout our society, especially on university campuses, namely, a deterioration of rational argument.

Silence and the Meaning of the Mass

Robert Cardinal Sarah’s recent book “The Power of Silence: Against the Dictatorship of Noise” centers around the unhappy role that noise has come to play in our culture and more specifically in the Church. As I read the sections of his book dealing with the importance of silence during Mass, I often found myself nodding vigorously.

A Word to Those Being Confirmed

One of the greatest privileges I have as a bishop is the opportunity to preside at the sacrament of Confirmation. I want to share with you in this article some of the key ideas in the latest iteration of my Confirmation sermon.

Our Lady of Fatima and a Theological Reading of History

This past week, we celebrated the one hundredth anniversary of the first apparition of Our Lady to a group of shepherd children near the Portuguese town of Fatima. The series of Fatima appearances—lasting from May until October of 1917—is one of the most extraordinary in the history of the Church. It has also beguiled political and cultural commentators outside the ambit of the Church, and it is this wider implication that I would like to explore.

How to Preach Like the Apostles

A twentieth century Anglican bishop memorably expressed the following insight: “When Paul preached, there were riots; when I preach, they serve me tea.” To all preachers, I might recommend a careful consideration of the kerygmatic sermonizing in the Acts of the Apostles. If you preach like Peter, they might not serve you tea after every homily, but they will know that they’ve been cut to the heart.

Pride, Humility, and Social Media

A recent article reminds us that social media can be a breeding ground for the unique type of spiritual distortion and dislocation that we traditionally call pride. What made all the difference for her was the arrival of her baby, in all of his densely-textured reality—a reality that she could appropriate only through humility.

The Benedict Option and the Identity/Relevance Dilemma

Rod Dreher’s “The Benedict Option: A Strategy for Christians in a Post-Christian Nation” has certainly emerged as the most talked-about religious book of 2017. There is a widely-felt instinct that something has gone rather deeply wrong with the culture and that classical Christianity, at least in the West, is in a bit of a mess. So, do we need the Benedict Option now?